Health Care Faculty

Vanderbilt’s health care and business management programs provide students with the opportunity to learn from and collaborate with researchers and innovators at the cutting edge of health care technology, informatics, policy and delivery models.  Representing a combination of distinguished academic researchers, leading health care practitioners and business leaders, Owen faculty work closely with student to address this rapidly growing industry from strategic, economic, ethical and operational perspectives.

In the Classroom

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Michael Burcham

Senior Lecturer of Entrepreneurship

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Michael Lapré

E. Bronson Ingram Associate Professor in Operations Management

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Rangaraj Ramanujam

Professor

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R. Lawrence Van Horn

Associate Professor of Management (Economics); Executive Director of Health Affairs

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Affiliated Faculty

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Jim Cooper

Adjunct Professor of Health Care Management; Congressman for Tennessee's 5th District

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John Doulis, M.B, B.S

Chief Information Officer, MedCare Investment Funds

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Edward W. Lomicka, CTP

Vice President and Assistant Treasurer, Community Health Syatems

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Wayne J. Riley, M.D., MPH, MBA, MACP

President and Chief Executive Officer, Meharry Medical College (MMC)

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Research Faculty

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Bruce Cooil

The Dean Samuel B. and Evelyn R. Richmond Professor of Management; Faculty Director, Executive MBA

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Luke Froeb

William C. Oehmig Associate Professor in Free Enterprise and Entrepreneurship

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M. Eric Johnson

Ralph Owen Dean and Bruce D. Henderson Professor of Strategy

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Michael Lapré

E. Bronson Ingram Associate Professor in Operations Management

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Rangaraj Ramanujam

Professor

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R. Lawrence Van Horn

Associate Professor of Management (Economics); Executive Director of Health Affairs

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Tim Vogus

Associate Professor of Management

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Research Seminars

Sorry is Never Enough: The Effect of State Apology Laws on Medical Malpractice Liability Risk

Larry Van Horn
Owen Graduate School
Wednesday, Apr 6, 2016 at 1:00PM | Room 216

Changing Interaction Dynamics in Hierarchical Groups: Evidence from a Nurse Role Expansion Field Experiment in Healthcare Groups

Ingrid Nembhard, Ira V. Hiscock Associate Professor of Public Health, Yale School of Public Health & Associate Professor, Yale School of Management
Yale
Thursday, Mar 17, 2016 at 1:00PM | Room Deans Conference Room
ABSTRACT

Changing Interaction Dynamics in Hierarchical Groups: Evidence from a Nurse Role Expansion Field Experiment in Healthcare Group

Presenter: Ingrid Nembhard, Ira V. Hiscock Associate Professor of Public Health, Yale School of Public Health & Associate Professor, Yale School of Management

 Co-author: Marissa King, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, Yale School of Management

ABSTRACT 

Relational inertia arising from formal roles and status hierarchies is endemic and problematic in many organizations. This study examines how role-power expansion for those in the middle of hierarchical groups, a central but understudied population, affects network structure and the nature of interactions within these groups. To do so, we conducted a field experiment assessing the effect of a formal role expansion for nurses involved in primary care delivery on interactions within hierarchical care groups. The role expansion for nurses was intended to improve health care coordination. We utilized wearable social sensors to collect second-by-second data on face-to-face interactions, conversational  characteristics, and body movements which allowed us to study who interacted with who in workgroups, as well as how interactions occurred. We find that role-power expansion contributed to development of a network structure consistent
with planned change goals and is one means of overcoming relational inertia. However, it also ignited more contentious interactions, associated with poorer group performance. Our study contributes to research on the interplay of formal and informal organization and network dynamics by documenting a key mechanism by which relational inertia can be overcome and analyzing the complexity in social interactions that can arise when this change occurs in hierarchical workgroups.
Our results also provide an explanation for why some health care organizations have not benefitted from nurse care coordination: The virtue of this role re-design can be undermined by the quality of the interactions fostered by this change – unless well-managed.

"Managing Health Care Talent: Lessons from HR and OB"

Fred Morgeson
Michigan State University
Friday, Oct 30, 2015 at 11:00AM | Room 106
ABSTRACT

Abstract

The Health Care and Social Assistance industry sector not only has the fastest employment growth, it is also projected to be the largest employer in the U.S. economy by 2022, with nearly 22 million jobs (over 13% of the U.S. economy). As a domain with a number of unique challenges, it is somewhat surprising that more of the insight generated in the fields of Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior have not been widely studied or adopted in health care. In my presentation, I will discuss two HR/OB studies that address key challenges in the modern health care workforce. In the first, I explore the issue of turnover and retention in acute care hospitals by examining why people leave and why they stay and what hospitals can do to enhance retention through their talent management and employee development practices. In the second study, I consider the issue of physician performance and how key non-technical competencies might play an important role when hiring physicians, particularly those targeted for senior leadership roles.

 

"Superbugs vs. Outsourced Cleaners: Employment Arrangements and the Spread of Healthcare-Associated Infections"

Adam Seth Litwin
Cornell University
Friday, Oct 23, 2015 at 9:00AM | Room Dean's Conference Room

Contracting in the Shadow of the Future

Professor Ranjani Krishnan
Michigan State University
Tuesday, Sep 23, 2014 at 9:40AM | Room TBA
ABSTRACT

 

Contracting in the Shadow of the Future

 

 

ABSTRACT

 

Contract
design involves control mechanisms that trade off the provision of ex
ante
 incentives to reduce losses from moral hazard, while avoiding
costs of ex post adaptations. We examine how this tradeoff
influences the form of the contract, namely cost-plus and fixed-price. We
investigate whether two control mechanisms, i.e., the possibility of a future
horizon, and bilateral reputation capital can mitigate the risk of
cost-inefficiency in cost-plus contracts and adaptation costs in fixed-price
contracts. We analytically show that the attractiveness of a cost-plus
(fixed-price) contract is increasing in (a) task complexity, (b) vendor rent
seeking potential, (c) contracting parties' potential for future business, and
(d) vendor reputation for cost containment (fair bargaining). We test the
model's predictions using contract data collected from the SEC material
contracts database, supplemented with hand-collected data from trade and
industry publications. Results using recursive, simultaneous, bivariate probit
estimations with endogeneity corrections support our predictions.

 

Keywords: Fixed price
contract, cost plus contract, incentives, hold up, relational contract.

 

JEL Classifications:
D23, D86, L14, M41

 

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